Author Topic: Strange Huang Di Cart  (Read 4275 times)

fcgamer

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« on: April 19, 2013, 01:51:08 PM »
Can't remember when Huang Di was released, and NTDEC spanned both the early years and the mid years of Famicom production; therefore, I hope this is the appropriate place to discuss Huang Di.

Received my third copy of the game a few days ago (yes, I am trying to corner the market on Huang Di....j/k).  Unlike my other two boxed copies, this one had a switch on top, and some modifications to the circuit board.  The switch is supposed to switch between an easy mode and difficult/high mode setting, though in the five minutes that I tested this out, I did not see any difference between the two modes.









Thoughts on this?  
All of these carts have the same circuit boards and numbers printed on the chips , etc, btw.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2013, 01:51:58 PM by fcgamer »

taizou

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2013, 02:23:36 PM »
Does the alternate mode possibly enable infinite/superhigh jumping? That happens in some emulators when running this game and I don't think anyone was ever sure why.

Smedis2

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2013, 05:07:44 PM »
CASSETTE
(also lol 69th post)

edit [MLX]: please post useful things
« Last Edit: April 20, 2013, 05:30:13 PM by MLX »

Superjustinbros

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2013, 02:05:16 AM »
I remember these "switches" were present on some games in emus, mostly stuff like Vs. series games, and that incredibly rare Nintendo World Championships cart, though some pirates have these switches as well. The one for Tiny Toon Adventures 6 changes the title screen to display an entirely different title, for example.

Still an interesting find.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2013, 02:05:53 AM by Superjustinbros »

fcgamer

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2013, 07:07:24 AM »
taizou
Apr 19 2013, 02:23:36 PM
Does the alternate mode possibly enable infinite/superhigh jumping? That happens in some emulators when running this game and I don't think anyone was ever sure why.[/quote]I just tried that out tonight and cannot seem to get infinite/superhigh jumping with either mode set.
Superjustinbros
Apr 21 2013, 02:05:16 AM
I remember these "switches" were present on some games in emus, mostly stuff like Vs. series games, and that incredibly rare Nintendo World Championships cart, though some pirates have these switches as well. The one for Tiny Toon Adventures 6 changes the title screen to display an entirely different title, for example.

Still an interesting find.[/quote]Yeah, some multicarts used switches as well to switch between games.  Bit Corp. did this quite often, and a few other companies used switches to switch between game menus.

I also remember seeing switches on Camerica's games to help defeat the lockout chip.

But yeah, still no idea what these switches are for.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2013, 07:08:50 AM by fcgamer »

Macaw

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2013, 08:05:12 AM »
Random question: How much do original boxed versions of Huang Di usually go for, and is Ruten where they usually appear? I think I only ever saw one on Tao Bao for like $150.

MLX

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2013, 08:11:41 AM »
Macaw
Apr 21 2013, 08:05:12 AM
Random question: How much do original boxed versions of Huang Di usually go for, and is Ruten where they usually appear? I think I only ever saw one on Tao Bao for like $150.[/quote]$150?

that's skyleague. Just forget about them. They buy games from taiwan to (try) to resell them at about the original price + 100 to 200 USD extra for them.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2013, 08:17:51 AM by MLX »

fcgamer

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Strange Huang Di Cart
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2013, 08:33:15 AM »
MLX
Apr 21 2013, 08:11:41 AM
Macaw
Apr 21 2013, 08:05:12 AM
Random question: How much do original boxed versions of Huang Di usually go for, and is Ruten where they usually appear? I think I only ever saw one on Tao Bao for like $150.[/quote]$150?

that's skyleague. Just forget about them. They buy games from taiwan to (try) to resell them at about the original price + 100 to 200 USD extra for them.[/quote]Not sure what the games usually sell for, boxed.  One I bought at a game shop in Taiwan and the other I had received as part of a trade for some other things.  With the one I received as a trade, I chose that game over cash as I thought that given the popularity, quality, and rarity of the game, I could eventually trade it for some of my own personal wants.  In this way, I'd much rather trade my games than sell just for cash.

The last copy (the loose one) I bought off of Ruten , and it was loose.  To be honest, it was expensive as well, probably around $30 when all is said and done.  I just think that the game is well-made, and thought that it never hurts to have an extra, whether for playing purposes or trading in the future for some other title I need for my collection.  Then when I received it, I saw it had switches, and was glad that I had grabbed it, even if we all are clueless as to what the switches do.  :)

As for actual value and price, it is honestly hard to say.  I personally believe that you can't put a true "value" on these items - they are all, tbh, rare, it's just that some have turned up thus far and some haven't.  If a game is in demand/hyped, it tends to sell for more, and if it is a sleeper, then it tends to sell for less.  If a collector really wants it bad when you are listing it for sale, it tends to go for more (if I see something I really want bad and someone posts it, I sometimes will pay a bit more for it, as chances of seeing another are not always so good).  If there is lack of a collector actively searching for the game, then the price tends to be a bit less.  So with these, I think there is a large complex formula in dictating the value, much more than what some others would believe.